Things to Know About the Color of Food
Things to Know About the Color of Food
  1. Purple asparagus, broccoli, and wax beans lose their color when cooked because the pigment in play—anthocyanin—becomes colorless as the heat changes acidity levels in the veggies’ cells.

  2. Q: Why did the blueberry turn red?
    A: Because it saw the salad dressing.

  3. Spinach is green because high levels of chlorophyll in its leaves absorb all colored light but the green band, which gets reflected outward.

  4. Yellow and white corn kernels from the same corn cob taste alike. Yellow ones have a slight nutritional edge, but they are not any sweeter.

  5. Eating too many carrots can turn your skin orange, a condition called carotenemia. But it would take a lot of carrots—10 a day for a few weeks.

  6. The Pantone Color Institute finds inspiration in tomatoes. Pantone 18-1660 is called Tomato, 18-1661 is called Tomato Puree, and 17-1563 is called Cherry Tomato.

  7. Food coloring agents abound in your larder. Use beets for red, lemon zinger tea for orange, turmeric for yellow, red cabbage for blue, and blueberries for purple.

  8. You can often tell what color a hen’s eggs are going to be by looking at the color of her earlobes.

  9. Oxidation happens. To keep enzymatic browning on cut fruits and vegetables at bay, eat them quickly, heat them up, or treat them to a toss in lemon juice.

  10. Food psychologists say round, white plates make food seem sweeter, while dark, angular plates intensify eaters’ perception of savory flavors.

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