Letter from the Editor

One of our regular columnists sent Chris and me a passionate email while we were preparing the fall issue after he witnessed “arguably the best-managed fishery, both commercial and recreational, in the world.”


He talked about the sustainability of the fishery and its unmatched beauty. He shared the health benefits of its wild productions as compared to some of the ecological consequences of farmed fish. The fish, he said, even retain their moisture, form, and flavor after being frozen for distribution and thawed for consumption (more to come on this in the winter issue).


This all sounded incredible…except that the fishery isn’t in Maine. We were stumped. Would it go against our mission to encourage readers to eat and buy local seafood one day, just to rave about another state’s fishery the next? Would that compromise our support for Maine fishermen and women? Could we still put local businesses and organizations first, even if we wrote about a product that wasn’t Maine-made?


I batted a similar conflict back and forth when researching and writing this issue’s article on grass-fed beef (page 30), knowing well enough the concerns about beef production’s impact on the environment. Edible Maine supports efforts to mitigate contributors to climate change, such as the work being done by organizations like the Center for Ecology-Based Economy (read more about one of their programs on page 48). We encourage our readers to be more independent when it comes to gathering and growing food (see a beginner’s guide to foraging on page 14). We also support small Maine farms that are transparent and do what’s best for the animal, because the demand for beef isn’t going to change overnight—but who you buy your beef from can. And shopping local matters.


Sustainable seafood and climate change are just two complex issues impacting our food system today, and they aren’t black and white—so our coverage of them can’t be, either. In order to deliver the full story, we’re seeking out the authentic scenarios that contribute to Maine’s vibrant farm-to-table economy (even if that means occasionally crossing state lines). This approach fulfills of our mission to promote a healthy and well-informed public.


Yes, we have an opinion. We want you to have one, too.

No. 10 / Fall 2019

Editorial in this issue

10 Things You Didn't Know About Pickling

10 Things You Didn't Know About Pickling

Fragrant fall dishes

Fragrant fall dishes

Heartier flavors that reflect the change of season

Gabrielle Cote, Pastry Artist

Gabrielle Cote, Pastry Artist

Using cake as a canvas

Shroom Nation

Shroom Nation

A first-time forager’s guide

Fall Flames

Fall Flames

Cocktails that can take the heat

Edible Main Street

Edible Main Street

Feeding an important conversation about climate change

Behind the label

Behind the label

Heartstone Farm defines grass-fed through flavor and sustainability

Know Your Seafood

Know Your Seafood

Why choosing local matters

Salt & Steel

Salt & Steel

Eating to remember

Recipes in this issue

Grilled Wild Maine Mushroom Pizza

Grilled Wild Maine Mushroom Pizza

Hungarian Mushroom Soup (for a crowd)

Hungarian Mushroom Soup (for a crowd)

Pastrami Spiced Pork Tenderloin with Cabbage Puree and Apple Mostarda

Pastrami Spiced Pork Tenderloin with Cabbage Puree and Apple Mostarda

Whole Wheat Apple Crisp

Whole Wheat Apple Crisp

Honeynut Squash with Wild Rice Stuffing

Honeynut Squash with Wild Rice Stuffing

Old Smoky Mashup

Old Smoky Mashup

Fennel Roasted Chicken

Fennel Roasted Chicken

Grilled Apple Sour

Grilled Apple Sour

Smokin’ Rosemary Lemon Drop

Smokin’ Rosemary Lemon Drop

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