Words by Charlotte Janelle
Vertical Farming On the Up and Up
Photography courtesy of Vertical Harvest
State-of-the-Art Facility Planned for Westbrook

Imagine looking upwards to pick the lettuce for a BLT, the tomatoes for a Caprese salad, or the basil for a batch of pesto. Now imagine you’re doing this inside, in the dead of winter. You are imagining yourself inside a vertical farming facility.

While vertical farming has been around since King Nebuchadnezzar II built the Hanging Gardens of Babylon in 600 B.C., 21st-century vertical farmers use controlled-environment agriculture technology to manipulate light, temperature, atmosphere, water and nutrient flow, and humidity to optimize plant growth on rotating crop carousels standing as high as 20 feet tall. Vertical farming is both lauded as a means for bringing year-round cultivation of fresh vegetables closer to urban centers and decried as an energy-intensive decoupling of food production from the wonders of natural ecosystems.

Modern vertical farms ground their crops in one of three types of systems: aeroponics (plants are grown in air with a mist providing nutrients), hydroponics (plants are grown in water infused with nutrients), or aquaponics (plants are grown in water populated with fish whose biowaste provides nutrients). Vertical farmers say any of these methods give plants the nutrients they need to grow without soil and use 95% less water than dirt farming.


Vertical Harvest, a company based in Jackson, Wyoming, is breaking ground this winter for a vertical farming facility in Westbrook in partnership with the city’s government. Co-founder Nona Yehia says her company gravitated to southern Maine because it has “a burgeoning local food community that’s really established and really exciting.”


As it does in its 10-year-old facility in Wyoming, Vertical Harvest plans to employ a hydroponics system and a partial greenhouse glass design in the new 70,000-square-foot farm to be located on Mechanic Street. Yehia estimates this farm will employ 50 people and produce a million pounds of lettuces, petite greens, microgreens and edible flowers per year. In addition to selling wholesale to hospitals, corporate cafeterias, schools, chefs, and caterers through distributor Native Maine, the company expects the Westbrook facility to have retail market space to sell its produce directly to consumers.


The design—a collaboration between Maine-based architecture and engineering firm Harriman and Jackson-based GYDE Architects where Yehia is a partner—lets natural light flow into the operation, giving the company the option of growing a diversity of crops. Yehia says this model can better sustain a local population; she notes, “You can’t feed a community on lettuce alone.” Her company’s mission is as much about the people as it is about the produce, as she strives to create “nourishing, resilient, and consistent employment opportunities through hyper-localizing the food system.”


Yehia doesn’t view vertical farming as a threat to traditional soil farming, but as an alternative means of empowering urban communities to help produce some of their own nutritionally dense, healthy food. Sustainable communities are successful ones, she says.

LOVE READING

edible MAINE?

You can have our exciting stories and beautiful images delivered right to your doorstep. Click HERE to purchase an annual subscription.

LOCAL FOOD NEWS,

SEASONAL RECIPES

AND EVENTS

DELIVERED FRESH

TO YOUR INBOX?

Join the edible MAINE community! SIGN UP for our e-newsletter and receive regular updates on local food issues, online exclusive stories, original recipes, sponsored buying guides and special issue sneak peeks.

Current Issue

No. 15 / Winter 2021

Recent Editorial

Tying up Loose Ends

Tying up Loose Ends

Reimagining School Lunches

Reimagining School Lunches

Precisely Portioning Pot

Precisely Portioning Pot

Finprints

Finprints

Vertical Farming On the Up and Up

Vertical Farming On the Up and Up

The Holiday Regifting Guide

The Holiday Regifting Guide

Bubbles and Berries in Bottles and Cans

Bubbles and Berries in Bottles and Cans

Maine Center for Entrepreneurs Helps Drives Maine Food Economy

Maine Center for Entrepreneurs Helps Drives Maine Food Economy

Smokin’ Cocktails at Home

Smokin’ Cocktails at Home

Stacked, Packed, and Hasselbacked

Stacked, Packed, and Hasselbacked

Old Techniques, New Tricks

Old Techniques, New Tricks

Intentional Mess

Intentional Mess

Recent Blog Posts

Header Logo 1.png
  • Email
  • Black Instagram Icon
  • Black Facebook Icon
  • Black Twitter Icon
 

Maine's award winning

food magazine

PO Box 11318

Portland, ME 04104

(207) 358-6112

hello@ediblemaine.com

MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

NEARBY:

edible NEW HAMPSHIRE

edible GREEN MOUNTAINS

edible BOSTON

edible NUTMEG